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Temples & Legends of Bengal
Index Of Bengal Kulapati's Preface
Preface Author
The Kalighat Temple of Calcutta Ram Krishna Mission Temples
The Temples in Burdwan The Temples in Hooghly
The Temples in Twenty four Parganas The Temples in Midnapore
The Temples in Birbhum Ektesvara - Siva Temple
The Temples In Bankura Jain Temples In Purulia
Kapilmuni Temple at Sagar Island A Chinese Temple
The Tibetan Temple At Bhotbagan Kiriteswari   Temple
Bhattamati Temple  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

THE TEMPLES IN BURDWAN

It is highly probable that though originally the Sadgops came with the higher Aryans to Bengal and attended them as serfs or menials in their successive progresses, they ultimately worked their way up through the Bagdi country to the pleasant pastures of Gopbhum, and findings themselves undistributed and alone there, since the non-pastoral Bagdis had deserted its barren and shallow soil for the richer delta, founded their kingdom which was of no great antiquity or duration, and could not have existed without the protection or neutrality of the neighboring Bagdi
sovereign of Bishnupur." %

The Bagdis and the Bauris have their own indigenous gods and goddesses besides those of the modern Hindu pantheon like Siva, Vishnu or Durga. Barapahari and Gosain Era of the Santals, Manasa the presiding deity of the snakes, Dharmaraj and Kudrasini are also stilling widely worshipped. Goats and fowls and even pigs are offered.  The Bauris have their priests belonging to their own caste who are called Degharia while the richer ones also employ Brahmin priests for worshipping the accepted deities of the Hindu pantheon.

The snake goddess Manasa holds an important place and her worship is not how confined to the Bagdis and Bauris alone Known as Bishahari she is worshipped by Hindus and all castes in order to secure immunity from snake bite. She is worshipped in various forms. Sometimes a small earthen spot is marked with vermilion and placed under a tree, where clay
snakes are arranged round it and a trident driven into the ground. Occasionally the Manasa plant (Euphorbia lingularia) is taken as her emblem. Also an image of a small four-armed female of yellow color is made and worshipped as Manasa. Many of the Bagdi and Bauri rich families have a separate shrine for Manasa in their homes. 

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Details of Ratnas on Krishnachandra temple, kalna.
About Temples In Burdwan
Introduction
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