[an error occurred while processing this directive]
HinduNet
  
Forums Chat Annouce Calender DigiCards Recommend Remote Invites
[an error occurred while processing this directive]


Temples & Legends of Himachal Pradesh
Index Of Himachal Pradesh Author
Introduction Background
Kulu - Manali Shyama Kali Temple
Manali Mandi
The Ardhanari Temple, Mandi Buddha Temple
Bijli Mahadev Idol Worship
Hidimba Banasur
Basishta Chamba
Kangra Area Manikaran
Bajreshwari Devi Chintpurni Devi Temple
Baijnath Temple Baglamukhi Deity And Her Temple
Chamunda Nandikeshwar Bilasur
Kinnaur Lahul   And Spiti
Wall Paintings Sirmur
Nath Temple  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

KULU-MANALI

The temple in Outer Saraj is a good example. Here the roof is covered with enormous tiles and the roof ridge consists often of a single large trunk of a tree the two ends of which are carved into a monster's or an animal or a crocodile head. This style of a temple is also the pattern in many of the affluent residential buildings. There is hardly anything to distinguish between a secular building and a temple building.

The third type has been categorized as the Chalet type. Penelope Chetwode artistically but rather effectively wants one to black out mentally the tower of the second type temple, place the top Storey on the ground and the Chalet style temple emerges. This type of temples is to be seen all over the Northern Himalaya and this is the type, which is patronized now.

The building rest on a broad wooden verandah with a roof supported by occasional carved pillars and the whole platform has railings and stands on wooden posts. The Durga temple outside Sarahan, below the Bashleo Pass in Outer Saraj is an example. There are several such temples including the one of Nar Singh at Nagar village.

The pagoda style temple is the fourth type and it really means a building with a succession of superimposed-pent roof, each one a little smaller than the one below it. The bottom Storey is usually of stone bonded by strong timber but the remainder of the building is mainly of wood. The eaves are coveredoccasionally with tiles of stone. The temple of Tripura Sundari at Nagar is a typical example.

Back ] Up ] Next ]

Bajaura Temple Of Visesvara Mahadeva
About Kulu-Manali
Introduction
page1
page2
page3
page4
page5
page6
page7
page8
page9
page10
page11
You are Here! page12
page13
page14
page15
page16
page17
page18
page19
page20

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
More Information about HinduNet Inc.
Privacy Statement
The Hindu Universe is a HinduNet Inc., website.
Copyrighted 1994-2003, HinduNet Inc.