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Temples & Legends Of Assam
Index Of Assam Kulapati's Preface
Preface Author's Introduction
Introduction Kamakhya
Asvakranta Vasisthasrama
Umananda Ugra Tara
Sukresvara  The Navagraha
Hajo Dah Parbatiya
Sib Sagar Tamresvari
Sri Surya Ruins The Hatimura Temple
The Satras-I The Satras-II
The Satras-III The Barpeta Satra
Majuli Satra Glossary
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

INTRODUCTION

The Tibeto-Burman and the Shans today constitute the bulk of the population of Assam, Valley as well as Hills. Risley rightly remarks that the Assamese are unmistakably Mongoloid.' Elwin considers them a rather modified Mongoloid with a dolichocephalic or long head but with the typical flat nose, high cheekbones and oblique slit-eyes.  At what period of history the Aryan speakers came into the valley of the Brahmaputra we cannot say. But there is no doubt that they arrived at a fairly early period, as evidenced by the references in the Ramayana and the Mahabharata and the Nidhanpur Copper plates grant.

The Aryan influence became so wide spread and penetrating that even minor Vedic customs and rituals became deep - rooted in the life of the common people. For instance, the Vedic custom of worship of Indra by setting up Indradhvaja still survives in Assam in the popular festival of Bhatheli (Bhasthali).

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Introduction
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