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Temples & Legends Of Maharastra
Index Of Maharastra Preface
Kulapati's Preface The Author
Morgaon - Moreshvar

Kolhapur - Mahalakshmi

Tuljapur - Bhavani Ganagapur - Dattatreya
Pedhe - Parashurama Bhimashankar - Bhimashankar
Tryambakeshvar - Trymbak Khandoba - Jejuri
Pandhapur - Vitthal Glossary
Biblography  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

TULJAPUR - BHAVANI

Leaving these tirths and secondary shrines, and proceeding towards the west, the visitor finds on his either side shops that offer for sale flowers, kumkum, halad and other substances offered to the deity. Then a large gateway faces him. This is a combined arch and trebeate construction. Crossing the gate one has to descend a set of some more steps before one enters the final and the lowermost level of the three phased prakara. This courtyard is much larger than the previous one and is enclosed within pillared aisles on all sides. The chief shrine is a series of some four buildings oriented towards the east. The easternmost part contains the shrine of Shri Siddheshvar Mahadev. Next to it is the homa-kund.Then comes the sabha- mandap. This is square on plan, with a cross-shaped constructional pattern. The pillars are of the Yadav Order, and beams and several other parts are profusely carved, unlike the inner parts of the temple and the pillars of the aisles. However, the arrangement of the pillars and the carvings on the stone betray the fact that it is a reconstruction from older materials. Stones have been put together without paying any attention to considerations of symmetry or the continuation of the designs carved on them. In addition to this unartistic arrangement the matter is further worsened by the colour decoration now applied to the structure. Bright and deep hues have been applied without caring for the balance of colours and the harmony of tones used. It is from this mandap, which has three entrances, the eastern side being blocked off by the boma-kund, that the visitor who has come only to have darshan can have a look at the image. The western door opens in the central mandap, the southern and northern ones opening in the courtyard. Only if the visitor has anything to offer in terms of money is he allowed inside the central mandap and have a closer look at the devi. There is a good deal of rush, and two doors intervene, the image is surrounded by those who are out to present valuable offerings and this arrangement of having darshan is to say the least, unsatisfactory. It is in this mandap that certain rites such as cropping the first locks of an infant- Javal', etc. arc performed in fulfilment of navas. This adds another element to the already thick crowds in the mandap.

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General View of the Temple, Tuljapur
About Tuljapur
Introduction
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