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Temples & Legends Of Maharastra
Index Of Maharastra Preface
Kulapati's Preface The Author
Morgaon - Moreshvar

Kolhapur - Mahalakshmi

Tuljapur - Bhavani Ganagapur - Dattatreya
Pedhe - Parashurama Bhimashankar - Bhimashankar
Tryambakeshvar - Trymbak Khandoba - Jejuri
Pandhapur - Vitthal Glossary
Biblography  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

TULJAPUR - BHAVANI

As the date of this verse is uncertain the reference may mean two things, either that the original old image was removed from Tuljapur to Parghat before the atrocities of Afzal Khan or that a new image was established as a. replica of the Bhavani of Tuljapur.The image might be new or old, but the pith is ancient. There can be n-) doubt on that count. A brief perusal of the known historical records show that the earliest reference to the goddess is from a copper plate grant of 1204 A.D This plate refers to the goddess as Tukai, but the name of the kshetra is unmistakable Tuljapur. The next known record comes from a small village named Kati in the Osmanabad district itself. It is dated 1398 A.D. This inscription records the donations of some presents by one Parashurama to the great Tulja-mata. There is a story in the Gurucharitra relating to the life of Shri Nrisimha Sarasvati that a person had been staying at Tuljapur to obtain relief from a malady, but the goddess appeared before him and directed him to proceed to Ganagapur where he would be cured. Some scholars date the Gurucha ritra to the early sixteenth century and Shri Nrisimha Sarasvati's lifetime to the first half of the fifteenth century. This -reference shows that the kshetra of the goddess was even then treated as a very important religious centre, Gunakriti, a Jaina author in his work Dharmamrit (1592 A.D.) has discussed the good and bad tirths and kshetras. The good tirths are, of course, those of the Jaina sect, various shrines of this or that tirthankaras. And amongst those that are dubbed as Ikutirths' or evils centres are Pandbarpur, Tuljapur-the two foremost kshetras of ]Hinduism. This is an obvious indication of the importance enjoyed by the kshetras even then.

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General View of the Temple, Tuljapur
About Tuljapur
Introduction
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