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Temples & Legends Of Somanatha

Kulapati's Preface

Author

Preface To the first Edition

Preface To The Second Edition

Publisher's Note: Fourth Edition

Abbreviations

List Of Illustrations

Somanatha- Lord Of Soma, The Moon God

Prabhasa In Historical Tradition

Dehotsarga-The Hallowed Spot

Shiva-Guardian Of National Resurgence

Shiva And His Worship

The First And The Second Temples

The Third Temple

The Guardian God Of Gujarat

Rise Of A Destroyer

Destruction of The Third Temple

The Fifth Temple

Renovation Of Tripurantaka

Destruction By All-Ud-Din Khilji

The Shrine Rises Again And Again

A Destroyer And A Restorer

A Great Restorer Rises

AS I Saw It

Planning: University Of Sanskrit

Preparation- Advisory Committee and The Trust

Dehotsarga

Somanatha-The Shrine Eternal

The Days Of Aurangzeb

The Mystery Of The Two Outlets: The First Temple

The Second, Third And Fourth Temples

The Fifth Temple

Topography

Historical Background

Introductory To Excavations

Objects Of The Excavations And A summary Of The Results

Descriptions Of The Cuttings

Conclusion: Identification And chronology Of The 'Original' Temple

Muslim Chroniclers On Somanatha

Stone Inscription In The Temple Of Bhadrakali

Stone Inscription At Veraval Under Bhima Deva II Of Junagadh

Cintra Prashasti Of The Reign Of Saranga Deva

Appendix

 
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

DESCRIPTIONS OF THE CUTTINGS

Phase I. -The temple stood on solid Kanjur stone foundations about 90 feet wide narrowing down to a depth of upwards of 13 feet below the then ground level. It was built of thin-graine reddish sandstone of which only two courses of a total height of 2 1/2 feet are available. Contemporaneous with this are:

a water outlet 'A' (4 ’' wide and 6" high) pierced in the northern wall of the garbhagriha and a brahmashila which rested on a square piece of dry-built Kanjur stone masonry' essentially hollow resembling a deep cistern, but filled in with rubble and alternate courses of well-laid stones and going as deep as the foundations themselves. The top of the brahmashila is marginally chamfered to a width of 6'’ on all the four sides leaving an area of 3 1/2 feet square in the centre. The functional utility of this is difficult to deter mine in the absence of the linga which was placed over it and to which presumably it relates.2


2 According to the shilpa shastras linga is divided into three equal parts, viz., brahma bhag, Vishnu bhag and shiva bhag. Of these, the first, which also is the lower-most, is square in section. The second, comprising the portion encompassed by the jaladhari or the yonipata is octagonal while the third, being the portion visible to the eye, is round. The centrally squared space of the brahmashila may thus provide aclue to the intended length of the linga.

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Jyotirlinga-Somanatha
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