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Temples & Legends of Bengal
Index Of Bengal Kulapati's Preface
Preface Author
The Kalighat Temple of Calcutta Ram Krishna Mission Temples
The Temples in Burdwan The Temples in Hooghly
The Temples in Twenty four Parganas The Temples in Midnapore
The Temples in Birbhum Ektesvara - Siva Temple
The Temples In Bankura Jain Temples In Purulia
Kapilmuni Temple at Sagar Island A Chinese Temple
The Tibetan Temple At Bhotbagan Kiriteswari   Temple
Bhattamati Temple  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

THE TEMPLES IN HOOGHLY

The front wall of the verandah, and also, to some extent, of the sanctum, is covered with brick panels finely carved in the best style of Bengali art, with figures of gods and goddesses and scenes from theepics and Puranas,chiefly Vaishnavite.The temple is said to have been built by Harishchandra Rai of Sheoraphuli,probably towards the end of the 18th century. It contains painted wooden images of Ram- chandra, Lakshman (to the right) and Sita (to the left), the images being the largest of all those at Guptipara. Just opposite this shrine, on the other side of thequadrangle, stands thefourth temple ofKrishnachandra, with small images of Krishna and Radha. * It is said to have been built by Dandi Madhusudan inthe time of Nawab Ali Vardi Khan.

The story is that the Dandi, who was in charge of the math, fell into arrears with his revenue, upon which the Nawab summoned Sri Brindabanji toMurshidabad. The Dandi fearing desecration and losing all hope of getting the god back, set up a new image of Krishna and Radha, and built this new temple for it."The chief Vaishnava festivals, viz., Ras, Dol, Rath and Ulta-rath, are observed by large crowds atGuptipara. Guptipara is also noted for introducing a community Puja where the rich and the poor combine, pool their resources and celebrate a puja.This sort of puja is known in Bengal as Barwari puja.

'The Friend of India', a monthly magazine of Srirampur in its issue for May 1820 mentions: "a new species of pooja which has been introduced into Bengal within the last thirty years, called Barowaree…About thirty years ago, at Gooptipara, near Santipoora a town celebrated in Bengal for its numerous Colleges, a number of Brahmins formed an association for the
celebration of Pooja independently of the rules of the Shastras. They elected twelve men as a Committee from which circumstance it take its name, and solicited subscriptions in all the surroundings villages." This is probably the first Barwari puja in Bengal. Barwari puja has now spread throughout Bengal.


* Bengali Temples, M.M. Chakravarti, Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1909, pp. 141-146, and figs., 3 and 9.

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Temples & Legends Of Bengal.
About Temples In Hooghly
Introduction
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