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Temples & Legends of Bengal
Index Of Bengal Kulapati's Preface
Preface Author
The Kalighat Temple of Calcutta Ram Krishna Mission Temples
The Temples in Burdwan The Temples in Hooghly
The Temples in Twenty four Parganas The Temples in Midnapore
The Temples in Birbhum Ektesvara - Siva Temple
The Temples In Bankura Jain Temples In Purulia
Kapilmuni Temple at Sagar Island A Chinese Temple
The Tibetan Temple At Bhotbagan Kiriteswari   Temple
Bhattamati Temple  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

THE TEMPLES IN HOOGHLY

* "The village is not old nor is the shrine. The place is not shown in Rennell's Atlas (1779-81), but appears in the Survey maps of 1830-45 as Taressure.Regarding its origin, the following curious legend is told. Raja Vishnu Das, aKshatriya by caste, lived at Mohaba Garkalingar in Oudh, early in the eighteenth century. Rather than remain under the rule of the Musalman Nawabs of Oudh, the Raja immigrated to Bengal, and took up his abode a village of Ramnagar at Balagarh, near Haripal, about two miles from where Tarakeswar now stands. With him came 500 followers of his own caste and 100 Brahmans from Kanauj.

The inhabitants of the neighborhood suspected them of being robbers, and sent word to the Nawab of Bengal at Murshidabad that a large gang of marauders, in complete armour and with strange beards and moustaches, had come and settled near Haripal. The Nawab having sent for them, the Raja presented himself, and sai that they were harmless folk who only, wanted some land whereon to settle. Tradition states that, to prove his innocence, Raja Vishnu Das went through the ordeal by fire, holding in his hand a red-hot iron bar, without sustaining injury. The Nawab was convinced of his honesty and gave him a grant of 500 bighas of land (equal to 1,500 bighas at the present day) eight miles from Tarakeswar.

Vishnu das had a brother, who became a religious mendicant and wandered, about the neighborhood as a devotee.  While living in the jungle near Tarakeswar, then known as Jot Savaram, he noticed that many cows entered the jungle with udders full of milk, and returned with them empty. Varamal Singh, as the devotee was called, followed them to see who milked them, and saw them discharge milk of their own accord on to a stone which had a deep
hollow in it, made by cowherds grinding rice.


10 Bengal District Gazetteers, Hooghly, by L.S.S. O'Malley.

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Temples & Legends Of Bengal.
About Temples In   Hooghly
Introduction
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