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Temples & Legends of Bengal
Index Of Bengal Kulapati's Preface
Preface Author
The Kalighat Temple of Calcutta Ram Krishna Mission Temples
The Temples in Burdwan The Temples in Hooghly
The Temples in Twenty four Parganas The Temples in Midnapore
The Temples in Birbhum Ektesvara - Siva Temple
The Temples In Bankura Jain Temples In Purulia
Kapilmuni Temple at Sagar Island A Chinese Temple
The Tibetan Temple At Bhotbagan Kiriteswari   Temple
Bhattamati Temple  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

THE TEMPLES IN HOOGHLY

TRIVENI

Triveni is usually called Muktaveni (open braided) to distinguish it from Prayag (Allahabad) which is called Yuktaveni (joint-braided). From here three streams branch out, the Bhagirathi flowing to the south, the Saraswati to the west and Jamuna or Kanchrapara khal to the east. The sanctity of the place has been recognized for many centuries and has been mentioned in Pavana-Dutam, a Sanskrit piece of the last quarter of the 12th century.  Triveni appears to have passed into the hands of the Oriya king, Mukunda Hari Chandan in the middle of the 16th century and the broad flight of steps on the river and Jamai Jangal, a high embankment stretching from Triveni to
Mahanad are attributed to the Oriyas.

The early European commercial people referred to the place as Trippany or Trevinny or Terbonee. The place had several famous Sanskrit Tols. Pandit Jagannath Tarka Panchanan, the tutor of Sir William Jones and a compiler of a digest of Hindu laws, was one of its distinguished scholars. It is, however, unfortunate that the existing Hindu remains are very few. It consists of two flights of steps side by side leading into the river bed and a group of seven small temples, 50 yards from the river of which the central one has a tower about 30' high and 12' square with a lingam inside.

A particular mention has to be made regarding the relies associated with Jafar Khan Gaji at Triveni. The remains are in the words of Sri Jadu Nath Sarkar "a museum of Muslim Epigraphy". The relics are also grand specimens of Hindu sculpture as is clear that many remains of even Hindu temples were utilized . According  to tradition Jafar Khan came to believe in the worship of Mother Ganga and had actually composed some Stotras in praise of Mother Ganga. Even today Hindus worship the memory of Jafar Khan. The alluvial soil of Bengal brought here a confluence of the two religious creeds, Hindu and Muslim.

Triveni is now more famous for the melas already referred to.

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Temples & Legends Of Bengal.
About Temples In Hooghly
Introduction
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