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Women In The Sacred Laws
Kulapati's Preface The Author
Foreword Prologue
The Dharma Sutras Contemporary Evidence
The Manu - Samhita The Later Law-Books
Digest On Hindu Law Espirit Des Lois
Major Sections

THE LATER LAW - BOOKS

Thus Vishnu mentions the Pakayajnas while describing the duties of a house- holder 7 and the different kinds of marriages, with their constituents, in the chapter dealing with 'women'. 8 In the Grhya-Sutras, as we have seen, they are described in the same context and form part of the wedding ceremony. Parasara does not supply us with any information on the above points.

It is Madhava charya who gives us considerable information on the various details of ceremonies. He draws his materials from different sources; and thus throws light on the various new developments in law and society since the days of Manu. One of the important points that engaged the attention of the mediaeval writers is the exact meaning of Sapinda, for a girl who is a Sapinda cannot be married.

Even the earlier lawgivers ordained this, but the question does not seem to have engrossed the attention of the earlier writers. It became important and complex by the time of Madhava charya; for not only did the selection of the bride depend upon it, but also the validity of the marriage was determined by it. As the girl must be Asapinda, the extension and the limit of this relation of Pindas became disputable.

The word has been thus explained. One who has one Pinda (funeral cake) common is a Sapinda; and hence one who has not this unanimity of Pindas is an Asapinda. This connection of the funeral cakes is believed to extend to seven generations. The funeral cake or Pinda, offered by one, is partaken of by three: the father, the grandfather and the great-grandfather.

Hence this Pinda extends to one of the Lepabhajins. The Matsya Purana defines the Lepabhajins as the fathers, from the fourth generation onwards, who partake of the funeral cake. They are three in number. Hence the relation of Pinda extends to seven generations, beginning from the offered of a Pinda.

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Women In The Sacred Laws
About The Later Law Books
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