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Temples & Legends of Bengal
Index Of Bengal Kulapati's Preface
Preface Author
The Kalighat Temple of Calcutta Ram Krishna Mission Temples
The Temples in Burdwan The Temples in Hooghly
The Temples in Twenty four Parganas The Temples in Midnapore
The Temples in Birbhum Ektesvara - Siva Temple
The Temples In Bankura Jain Temples In Purulia
Kapilmuni Temple at Sagar Island A Chinese Temple
The Tibetan Temple At Bhotbagan Kiriteswari   Temple
Bhattamati Temple  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

THE TEMPLES IN MIDNAPORE

The upper left hand holds a human skull while the lower holds the head of a demon. There are also two small idolsrepresenting Siva and a small image of Dasabhuja Mahishamardini, on the same platform with the deity. This is obviously a Sakti temple is crowned by a chakra or discus, which may have been set up by one of the Kaibartta Rajas. Animal sacrifice is not encouraged.

The temple has the clear impact of the Orissan style of architecture. The three apartments of the Baradeul, the Jagamohan and the Natmandir are usually found in any of the big Orissa temples. The Jagannath Temple at Puri has them and also a place where the Pandits sit
and have religious discourses. The Jnan-Mandap of this Midnapore temple has its counterpart where Mukti-Mandap sits in Puri.

"Various conflicting traditions narrate how the temple was founded. The most popular relates how in the days of king Garuradhwaj, of the ancient Peacock dynasty, a fisherman was one day unable to procure a dish of Saul fish for the table of the king, and the angry monarch
ordered him to be put to death.

The fisherman managed to make his escape to the jungle, where the goddess Bhima appeared to him. She told him to lay in a stock of the fish and dry them, and promised that she would restore them to life, when he wanted them, by sprinkling them with water of a certain well, which had the virtue of restoring dead things to life. The fisherman followed the instructions of the goddess, and daily took the fresh fish to the king, who, finding that the supply never failed, in season and out of season, questioned the fisherman, and extracted
from him the secret of the immortal well.

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Rekha Temple, Barakar, Bengal
About Midnapore
Introduction
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