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Temples & Legends Of Bengal
Index Of Bengal Kulapati's Preface
Preface Author
The Kalighat Temple of Calcutta Ram Krishna Mission Temples
The Temples in Burdwan The Temples in Hooghly
The Temples in Twenty four Parganas The Temples in Midnapore
The Temples in Birbhum Ektesvara - Siva Temple
The Temples In Bankura Jain Temples In Purulia
Kapilmuni Temple at Sagar Island A Chinese Temple
The Tibetan Temple At Bhotbagan Kiriteswari   Temple
Bhattamati Temple  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

THE TEMPLES IN MIDNAPORE

The skill and ingenuity displayed in its construction still excite admiration. The shrine is surrounded by a curious wall of stone faced on the inside and outside with brick and standing on a masonry plinth 30 feet high. The foundation consists of large logs of wood placed upon the earth in rows. The wall rises to a height of 60 feet, its thickness at the base being 9 feet. The whole is covered with a dome-shaped rood.

Stones of enormous size were used in its construction, and raise the spectator's wonder as to how they were lifted into their places at a time when machinery was unknown. Outside the temple, but within the enclosure, is a punang tree (callo- phyllum inophyllum) supposed to have the virtue of redeeming women from barrenness.

There is small tank in the north of the enclosure, and the popular belief is that a barren woman will conceive, if she plunges into the tank with a basket of fruit on her head, picks up whatever reaches her, and suspends it to the tree with a rope made of her hair.

The dread of the anger of the goddess is great. Even the Marathas, when ravaging Lower Bengal, left Tamluk untouched and made valuable offerings to the temple. The river Rupnarayan itself is believed to still its waters as it flows by the temple, while a short distance above or below
the shrine the waves are turbulent. The river has on several occasionsencroached near the temple, and once reached to within ten cubits of the walls; but although even the priests deserted the edifice from fear that it would be washed away, the stream was allowed no nearer approach. 

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Rekha Temple, Barakar, Bengal
About Midnapore
Introduction
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