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Temples & Legends Of Somanatha

Kulapati's Preface

Author

Preface To the first Edition

Preface To The Second Edition

Publisher's Note: Fourth Edition

Abbreviations

List Of Illustrations

Somanatha- Lord Of Soma, The Moon God

Prabhasa In Historical Tradition

Dehotsarga-The Hallowed Spot

Shiva-Guardian Of National Resurgence

Shiva And His Worship

The First And The Second Temples

The Third Temple

The Guardian God Of Gujarat

Rise Of A Destroyer

Destruction of The Third Temple

The Fifth Temple

Renovation Of Tripurantaka

Destruction By All-Ud-Din Khilji

The Shrine Rises Again And Again

A Destroyer And A Restorer

A Great Restorer Rises

AS I Saw It

Planning: University Of Sanskrit

Preparation- Advisory Committee and The Trust

Dehotsarga

Somanatha-The Shrine Eternal

The Days Of Aurangzeb

The Mystery Of The Two Outlets: The First Temple

The Second, Third And Fourth Temples

The Fifth Temple

Topography

Historical Background

Introductory To Excavations

Objects Of The Excavations And A summary Of The Results

Descriptions Of The Cuttings

Conclusion: Identification And chronology Of The 'Original' Temple

Muslim Chroniclers On Somanatha

Stone Inscription In The Temple Of Bhadrakali

Stone Inscription At Veraval Under Bhima Deva II Of Junagadh

Cintra Prashasti Of The Reign Of Saranga Deva

Appendix

 
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

APPENDIX

It was only in December 1922 that Munshi could visit Somanatha for the first time. He has put down his impressions of his visit:

"Desecrated, burnt and battered, it still stood firm-a monument to our humiliation and ingratitude. I can scarcely describe the burning shame which I felt on that early morning as I walked the broken floor of the once-hallowed sabhamantap littered with broken pillars and scattered stones. Lizards slipped in and out of their holes at the sound of my unfamiliar steps, and-Oh! the shame of it-an inspector's horse, tied there, neighed at my approach with sacrilegious impertinence."

The dreamer in Munshi saw the temple as it was in 1024, its spire rising to the sky, mighty acharyas and kings laying their heads in humility at the door-step of the sanctum. He heard the jingling anklets of the temple dancers as they sang to the joyous rhythm of drumbeats.

He saw vast crowds anxious to have darshan of the deity, hope in their hearts and humility in their souls. And he also saw the invader, his sword gory with the blood of innocent worshippers, break the image into three parts. It was out of this dream that came his most famous novel Jaya Somanatha, most of which was written in Pahalgam in Kashmir with the Shishnaga dancing from stone to stone with endless exuberance in front of him.

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