[an error occurred while processing this directive]
HinduNet
  
Forums Chat Annouce Calender DigiCards Recommend Remote Invites
[an error occurred while processing this directive]


Temples & Legends of Bengal
Index Of Bengal Kulapati's Preface
Preface Author
The Kalighat Temple of Calcutta Ram Krishna Mission Temples
The Temples in Burdwan The Temples in Hooghly
The Temples in Twenty four Parganas The Temples in Midnapore
The Temples in Birbhum Ektesvara - Siva Temple
The Temples In Bankura Jain Temples In Purulia
Kapilmuni Temple at Sagar Island A Chinese Temple
The Tibetan Temple At Bhotbagan Kiriteswari   Temple
Bhattamati Temple  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

RAM KRISHNA MISSION TEMPLES

But against this, at the entrance, there is a large arch, supported by double pillars, which recalls a pattern we come across at Ajanta, modified to bring in an atmosphere of earlier Bharaut or Sanchi Toranas pattern by the coiled ends projecting from the pillar capitals as in the case of the
Toranas architrave’s. There is, at once, here a picture presented of the facade of the Western Indian cave type as, for instance, at Kondane and Nasik. It recalls the arch directly over the rectangular doorway and the larger arch of the open window above it in the Nasik Chaitya hall. The large open arch is indeed most effective in creating this impression.

At the same time it also recalls somewhat the facade of the Chaitya hall cave XIX from Ajanta, showing the porch which is almost as it were compressed against the facade of this structure in such a manner that the impression of the portico is suggested, though it is lacking. It is also the elegance of this later Gupta work that suggests itself in this. The pattern worked on the arch above the double pillars are modem looking and in the centre the emblem of the Ramakrishna Mission, showing the Swan and the Rising Sun, is beautifully arranged to occupy the entire place. While the general appearance, as one enters, is suggestive of the facade at Ajanta and other Western Indian Buddhist caves, the windows on either side and the doorways with scalloped arch to the sides, as also the windows there, are suggestive of similar pattern in Mogul and Rajput
palaces and recall Indo-Saracenic influences.

The projecting balconies also suggest the same."". ...The main shrine itself, unlike those of most temples in India, which have little or no light, is very well ventilated and as bright as any of the other parts of this building. In fact, the central shrine is the brightest here, even brighter than the long hall itself, unlike as in the cave temples
just referred, where the most important stupa towards the end is not particularly away from this row of pillars, but is just close to them within the curve of the gajaprasthakara shrine, which is only part of the hall itself, the farthest end of it.

Back ] Up ] Next ]

 Belur Math Temple
About Ram krishna   Mission Temples
Introduction
Page1
Page2
Page3
Page4
Page5
Page6
Page7
Page8
Page9
Page10
Page11
Page12
Page13
Page14
Page15
Page16
Page17
You are Here! Page18
Page19
Page20

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
More Information about HinduNet Inc.
Privacy Statement
The Hindu Universe is a HinduNet Inc., website.
Copyrighted 1994-2003, HinduNet Inc.