[an error occurred while processing this directive]
HinduNet
  
Forums Chat Annouce Calender DigiCards Recommend Remote Invites
[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Temples & Legends of Himachal Pradesh
Index Of Himachal Pradesh Author
Introduction Background
Kulu - Manali Shyama Kali Temple
Manali Mandi
The Ardhanari Temple, Mandi Buddha Temple
Bijli Mahadev Idol Worship
Hidimba Banasur
Basishta Chamba
Kangra Area Manikaran
Bajreshwari Devi Chintpurni Devi Temple
Baijnath Temple Baglamukhi Deity And Her Temple
Chamunda Nandikeshwar Bilasur
Kinnaur Lahul   And Spiti
Wall Paintings Sirmur
Nath Temple  
Major Sections
Temples  & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

CHAMBA

The second Storey has a similar number of niches, but without arches. Eleven dancing caryatids, standing on consoles projecting above the pillars of the preceding Storey and again holding the brackets supporting the top Storey frame these niches. And in each there sits some godling in a miniature chapel with a three- fold roof.This last Storey resembles, to some degree, that at the bottom, but the columns are lower, the arches depressed, and the niches are occupied by squatting figures with human or animal heads (ganas) . The projecting cornices of the last two storeys are decorated with a frieze of suspended knobs (opali), a motif found also in other hill temples.

On this pediment tests the gable, a triangular panel enclosing a trefoiled niche in which an impressive deity is seated. A frieze of nine deities sitting, with crossed legs, in very low arched niches supports this gable. Apparently these are the navagraha (nine planets). The other two sides of the triangle are ornamented with a rounded cornice moulding of highlystylized scales or leaves. In the arch Vishnu is sitting, held up by his vahana garuda, while on both sides two rather distorted chamara (fly whisk) bearers are standing. Garuda, with very short legs and almost prostrate, is quite inconspicuous, hardly more than a variant of the vakshas on the pediment.

Vishnu, with three faces (boar, human and lion) amidst a mass of ringlets, once had twelve arms holding in their hands the symbols of his power, though now many of them are broken. Of his right arms the uppermost holds a parasol, the second probably a mace or a lotus flower, the third an arrow, the fourth rests on the attendant, while the last two are lost; of his left arms the uppermost carries a lotus, or trident, the second a disk, the third a bow, the fourth rests on the other attendant, the two lower most are likewise broken.

Back ] Up ] Next ]

Kei Gumpha - Spiti Valley
Introduction
page1
page2
page3
page4
page5
page6
page7
page8
page9
page10
page11
page12
page13
page14
page15
page16
page17
page18
page19
page20
page21
You are Here! page22
page23
page24
page25
page26
page27
page28
page29
page30
page31
page32
page33
page34
page35
page36
page37
page38
page39
page40
page41
page42

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
More Information about HinduNet Inc.
Privacy Statement
The Hindu Universe is a HinduNet Inc., website.
Copyrighted 1994-2003, HinduNet Inc.