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Temples & Legends of Himachal Pradesh
Index Of Himachal Pradesh Author
Introduction Background
Kulu - Manali Shyama Kali Temple
Manali Mandi
The Ardhanari Temple, Mandi Buddha Temple
Bijli Mahadev Idol Worship
Hidimba Banasur
Basishta Chamba
Kangra Area Manikaran
Bajreshwari Devi Chintpurni Devi Temple
Baijnath Temple Baglamukhi Deity And Her Temple
Chamunda Nandikeshwar Bilasur
Kinnaur Lahul   And Spiti
Wall Paintings Sirmur
Nath Temple  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

CHAMBA

The influence of Mughal and Rajput art is not surprising in the sixteenth century; it penetrated probably via Balaur which then had some control over Bhadrawah; the Tibetan element is understandable in a frontier area where the Tibetan Lahulis venerate Mrikula Devi as Do-rje-phag-mo (Sanskrit Vajravarahi)"Chamunda temple at Devi Kothi-Of the other number-less village temples, mostly dedicated to Devi or Naga, the only one which deserves a passing notice is that of Chamunda, at Devi Kothi, on account of the Mughal influence manifest in its wood-carvings. It was built by Raja Umed Singh, A.D. 1754.

The same influence is observable in some profane buildings of that period, e.g. the State Kothi at Brahmaur ascribed to Raja Prithi Singh, which was destroyed in the earthquake of the fourth April, 1905. Specimens of modern wood-carvings, as far removed from the old work in merit as in time, may be seen at Mindal, opposite Sach, on the temple of Chamunda (commonly called Mindal Devi) and on the little Naga temple near Kilar. The splendid temples and the antiquities in Chamba district could not have been possible but for some of the enlightened and religious rulers of Chamba. Chamba State was also lucky that it did not face the problem of a ruthless destruction by invaders or internal disruption.

The brazen idols of Meru Varman nearly contemporaneous with the temple of Martand in Kashmir still stand in their ancient shrines of carved cedar wood. Some of the original copper-plate grants of the rulers are still preserved and produced by the descendants of the original donees. Like Rajatarangini in Kashmir Chamba State has its Vansavali which preserves a fair account of the rulers in a chronological order. Raja Meru Varman flourished near about A.D. 700. The earlier king Maru Varman could be described as the historical predecessor of Meru Varman and he founded the town of Brahmapura and made it the capital of the new State. Meru Varman extended the limits of the State by conquests.

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Kei Gumpha - Spiti Valley
About Chamba
Introduction
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