[an error occurred while processing this directive]
HinduNet
  
Forums Chat Annouce Calender DigiCards Recommend Remote Invites
[an error occurred while processing this directive]


Temples & Legends of Himachal Pradesh
Index Of Himachal Pradesh Author
Introduction Background
Kulu - Manali Shyama Kali Temple
Manali Mandi
The Ardhanari Temple, Mandi Buddha Temple
Bijli Mahadev Idol Worship
Hidimba Banasur
Basishta Chamba
Kangra Area Manikaran
Bajreshwari Devi Chintpurni Devi Temple
Baijnath Temple Baglamukhi Deity And Her Temple
Chamunda Nandikeshwar Bilasur
Kinnaur Lahul   And Spiti
Wall Paintings Sirmur
Nath Temple  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

CHAMBA

The eyes of the goddess are inlaid with silver, and her four arms hold, in the upper right hand, a trident (trisula), in the lower right a sword (khadga), in the upper left band a bell (ghanta) and in the lower left the tail of the buffalo demon. Shakti Devi temple at Chitrari-Very similar to the Lakshana Devi temple at Brahmaur is that of Shakti Devi at Chitrari. It belongs to the same period as that of Lakshana, and, is a good specimen of the general pattern of hill shrines described above. Chitrari is a village in Piu illaqa, lying in a fertile upland on the slope south of the Ravi, two-third of the way from Chamba upto Brahmaur, not far below the junction of the Budhil and Tundah nullas with the Ravi.

The village is inhabited by Brahmins and musicians connected with the temple and with the great mela celebrated in the month of Bhadon when dancing goes on day and night, after the idol of the Devi has been bathed in water brought by runners from the Mani Mahes lake beyond Brahmaur. The Chitrari temple is regarded as one of the most holy sanctuaries of the hills, competing with those of Lakshana Devi at Brahmaur and of Bhavani atKangra. And certainly it is one of the oldest. Tradition attributes its foundation to Mushuna, the legendary ancestor of the old Brahmaur dynasty.

But the inscription on the idol mentions Meru Varman, the founder of Brahmaur, and another tradition says that the temple was the last work of Gugga, the master- artisan of Meru Varman. This statement is more or less borne out by archaeological evidence for the building resembles the Lakshana temple at Brahmaur in many respects. But there are a number of differences both in its plan and decoration. For it has no separate mandapa, but only one large shrine (sixteen feet one inch by sixteen feet one inch), which however, seems later to have been subdivided into a cella and a mandapa.

Back ] Up ] Next ]

Kei Gumpha - Spiti Valley
About Chamba
Introduction
page1
page2
page3
page4
page5
page6
page7
page8
page9
page10
page11
page12
page13
page14
page15
page16
page17
page18
page19
page20
page21
page22
page23
page24
page25
You are Here! page26
page27
page28
page29
page30
page31
page32
page33
page34
page35
page36
page37
page38
page39
page40
page41
page42

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
More Information about HinduNet Inc.
Privacy Statement
The Hindu Universe is a HinduNet Inc., website.
Copyrighted 1994-2003, HinduNet Inc.